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Post-cardsRussian Empire
Russian Empire

Postcard 5 ½ war loan "The more money, the more shells"

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Marking:
84359
Country:
Russian Empire
Period:
1914-1917 gg
The original.
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Marking:84359
Country:Russian Empire
Dating:1914-1917 gg
The original.
DescriptionReviews
Description

The original postcard of the PMV period is in excellent collector's condition. I didn't pass the mail. Quite rare. Guarantee of authenticity.

History

Various sources were involved to cover the military expenses of the Russian army during the First World War. One of them was domestic loans. During the years of the First World War, Russia held 6 domestic bond loans totaling 8 billion rubles, which brought 7.4–8 billion rubles to the treasury. net revenue. With their help, about 30% of all military expenditures of the Russian Empire were covered. Initially, such loans within the country were focused mainly on banks and wealthy citizens. The fourth loan, issued in October 1915, aimed to expand the social base at the expense of holders of small capital. For the first time in the history of public finance in Russia, visual agitation was resorted to in order to attract the broad masses of the people. In 1916, the State Bank decided to start issuing propaganda posters and postcards to agitate subscriptions to war loans. Such artists as Ivan Vladimirov, Vladimir Varzhansky, Richard Zarins and others were involved in their creation.


In an effort to awaken patriotic feelings among the people, the official press for the first time called another loan a military one. Posters, propaganda brochures and posters with the image of a young worker at a machine for grinding shells were produced everywhere. The state tried in every possible way to attract peasants to credit operations, who so far remained aloof from borrowing practices. After the February Revolution, the Provisional Government already issued an internal loan for the continuation of hostilities, called the "Freedom Loan". From the memoirs of banker V.P. Anichkov, it is known that Grand Duke Sergei Mikhailovich signed up for a "Freedom Loan" by buying bonds for 500,000 rubles. These five hundred thousand comprised his entire fortune.

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